Forms IV and V (Years 10 and 11)

All pupils take the core GCSE subjects of English Language, English Literature, Mathematics, Combined or Triple Science and a Modern Foreign Language (French or Spanish). Girls are set for languages and will be prepared to take Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking examinations. There is the option to take Spanish in addition to French, Latin or Greek. This will be decided in conjunction with the Modern Foreign Languages department according to ability and experience.

All pupils follow a programme of Personal, Health, Social, Citizenship and Economic Education, which includes guidance on careers and a full PE programme.

DOWNLOAD THE GCSE OPTIONS GUIDE

Core Courses

MATHEMATICS

“Mathematics, rightly viewed, possess not only truth, but supreme beauty”
Bertrand Russell

Mathematics is an essential and inevitable part of our everyday lives; it is a subject that should not be restricted to the confines of a classroom. Therefore it is our goal to show the real world applications of the subject throughout our curriculum from Form I up to and including A Level Further Mathematics. Not only do we want our students to see the value of Mathematics, we also want them to enjoy it and to achieve their full potential in the subject. We encourage every girl to take an active and enthusiastic role in their lessons, learning through a variety of different teaching styles and using a mixture of guided discovery, ICT and traditional methods. We aim to develop each girl’s problem solving skills and ability to think and work independently.

iGCSE

We are following the Edexcel 2016 specification for IGCSE Mathematics A, which emphasises the importance of making connections between mathematical concepts and applying the functional elements of Mathematics to real life situations. The topics covered in the course build upon the topics that have been taught in Forms I and II, with the introduction of new topics that the students haven’t seen before. The course is examined in Form V through two papers, each worth 50% of the course and a calculator is permitted for both papers. We aim for all students to study the Higher Tier course, which will eventually allow them to access the grades 9 to 4.

ENGLISH

“And what are you reading, Miss —?” “Oh! It is only a novel!” replies the young lady, while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. “It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda”; or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language.”
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen.

The English Department aims to enable students to write with fluency and accuracy, and to speak with eloquence and assurance. We also develop in the girls a love of reading, in addition to the ability to analyse texts and develop their own ideas with confidence.

GCSE English Language (AQA)

The course enables students to develop their close reading skills, through analysis of a range of fiction and non-fiction extracts. They will use the skills they have developed to explore the language and structure of these texts, as well as selecting specific information and making informed comparisons. Students will also practise their creative writing, in addition to non-fiction writing, including letters, articles and speeches. There is also the opportunity to develop their spoken language skills by delivering a presentation on a topic of their choice and responding to questions.

GCSE English Literature (AQA)

The course gives students the opportunity to study a range of literature texts, including a 19th century novel, a selection of poetry, a modern text and a Shakespeare play. They will engage with these texts through discussion, analysis and essay writing. These contain themes and ideas which students will explore as they develop their own response to the text. Students will explore the ways in which writers achieve their effects and how they are informed by their historical and literary context. This course will enable them to develop the critical skills required to study English Literature at A Level.

GCSE texts include: ‘Pride and Prejudice’, Power and Conflict poetry, ‘An Inspector Calls’ and ‘The Merchant of Venice’.

SCIENCES

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known”
Carl Sagan

From the moment you are born, and throughout your life, you are surrounded by Science – the air you breathe, the food you eat and the clothes you wear – they’re all Science. Whether you want to care for penguin colonies in Antarctica or work in a dynamic business environment, Science can help you. From research in space, to the depths of the oceans, Science helps you understand the world around you and opens up lots of career opportunities. Science students are highly valued for their numerical, linguistic and analytical skills.

Every student at Heathfield School is required to take Science. Students start to cover the GCSE content in Form III allowing those more able to access three separate Science GCSEs. All students in the top Science set are entered for the three separate Science GCSEs. This involves them taking all three written units for each of the sciences at the end of their Form V year.

Students who choose not to take the three separate Sciences will take Combined Science which covers Biology, Chemistry and Physics through a series of six different written examinations. Students then gain a numerical grade from a 17 point scale from 1-1 to 9-9.

For all of the Science GCSEs, students will have to complete compulsory experiments and their practical skills and techniques will be examined in the written examinations.

All students, irrelevant of which route they have followed, are able to go onto study Science at A Level providing they attain at least a Grade 6 at GCSE and Grade 6 or above in Mathematics.

Language

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES

“A different language is a different vision of life”
Frederico Fellini

Given Britain’s position in Europe and the increasing need to communicate with our continental neighbours as well as with international existing and potential partners, we highly value the study of modern languages at Heathfield. An ability to speak English as well as French or Spanish is an advantage on the international job scene. Language teachers at Heathfield School are native speakers. The presence of a French and Spanish speaking assistant is another important feature of the department. They provide an added view of their country and allow more creative activities to take place both in and outside the classroom.

All students take their GCSE examinations in Form V although fluent or near-fluent speakers and exceptional linguists can sit their GCSE at the end of Form IV. It is not possible to enter an MFL GCSE course as a complete beginner.

The GCSE specification allows pupils to develop the ability to use their chosen language not only to communicate but also for intellectual stimulation and enjoyment. The course aims to broaden pupils’ understanding of the culture of the countries of the languages they are studying. The four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening will be explored and developed across a wide range of topic areas.

In addition to French and Spanish, we can also provide tuition in other languages including Arabic, Chinese, Italian, Japanese, German, Modern Greek, Portuguese and Russian.

The MFL department runs weekly after school Enrichment Clubs for both French and Spanish students where they improve the level of their language skills through written exercises, taking part in lively discussions and activities that improve grammar and increase vocabulary. The department also runs a reading club for advanced linguists and holds international movie nights every week to enable students to practise their listening skills as well as providing an opportunity to encounter and discuss experiences, emotions and cultural differences.

Spanish Trip to Córdoba in Andalucía

An exciting trip to Córdoba in Spain is organised for GCSE and A Level students every other year. The students have the opportunity to improve their comprehension skills and are encouraged to actively use their Spanish in everyday situations. They enjoy recording each other communicating in Spanish with the local community.

The trip includes fascinating visits to the incredible Mezquita, The Medina Azahara ruins, the Reyes Catolicos Palace and students also engage in the popular and dramatic processions of the Semana Santa festival.

Pupils may then choose any three or more from the following:

Options

ART & DESIGN

The Art Department continues to flourish, building on its long legacy of alumni succeeding within the areas of Fine Art, Textiles, Sculpture, 3D Design, Moving Image and Illustration, and it is no surprise that a high proportion of girls take GCSE and A Level Art & Design, with a view to continuing at Higher Education.

The Department has an outstanding record for successful entry to some of the most prestigious art institutions, both nationally and internationally, including Central St. Martins, London College of Fashion, Parsons (New York) and Falmouth. The Art Department also enjoys the support of a Fashion Designer in Residence, who organises the annual fashion show, and brings additional skills to an already vibrant and exciting space.

Facilities include an art library, pattern cutting room, sewing room, fine art studio, 3D sculpture room, a computer suite complete with Adobe Photoshop, and a kiln for firing glass and ceramics. We offer a variety of student workshops to supplement the rich curriculum that we already offer such as Life Drawing, Sculpture, Printmaking, Millinery, Illustration and Felt making.

If you are creative and enjoy working hard and you are interested in a creative pathway such as jewellery design, furniture design, costume design, set design, fashion styling, film-making, animation, architecture, graphic design and illustration, the Art Department at Heathfield is a great place to start.

BUSINESS

We aim to inspire and nurture the next generation of entrepreneurs, economists and accountants. Given that business underpins so much of our very existence, it makes sense that we should try to understand how commercial organisations operate. Business aims to encourage a critical understanding of business organisations and the markets they serve, as well as understanding government decisions that influence both consumer and business behaviour.

These courses require and develop a range of skills including decision-making and problem-solving in the light of evaluation, and making use of numerical data. The courses provide an excellent foundation to understanding the key concepts of business and economics and provide an insight into areas of further study or careers.

The course is divided into two themes. Theme 1: Investigating small business, looks at enterprise and entrepreneurship, spotting business opportunities, putting business ideas into practice, making effective business decisions and understanding the external influences on business.

Theme 2: Building a business, considers marketing, operational, human resource and financial decisions larger businesses have to make, as well as more advanced business concepts such as ratio analysis, and the product lifecycle.

There are two 1 hour 30 minute examinations. Each paper is divided into three sections, consisting of calculations, multiple choice questions and extended writing questions. Longer questions focus on business contexts.

Students have the opportunity to visit the BMW Mini Factory in Oxford to see a manufacturing business in operation. We are also regularly invited to attend Eton College’s Keynes Society lectures. Lower Sixth students are also charged with the running of the school stationery shop in order to put classroom theory into practice. Students are also encouraged to take part in the ‘Tycoon in Schools’ competition.

CLASSIC CIVILISATION

“I am not an Athenian or a Greek but a citizen of the World”
Socrates

The subject Classics is defined at Heathfield School as the study of Latin, Greek and Classical Civilisation. The relevance and purpose of Classics in particular Latin and Greek has been questioned in recent times but in the words of Professor Peter Jones of the University of Newcastle: “if Latin and Greek are dead languages, then Mozart is dead music, and Shakespeare is dead poetry.” The knowledge and skills acquired through the study of Classics will be similar to other subjects. What makes Classics distinctive is its focus on the Greek and Roman time periods that is from the Minoan civilisations of Crete to the fall of the Roman Empire in the third century AD.

Students benefit much from the study of the West’s earliest literate cultures. The exploration of the Greek and Roman civilisations gives the 21st century student much to ponder on in respect to her own worldview and the society in which she belongs.

For GCSE, the Classics department offers three option subjects of Latin, Classical Greek and Classical Civilisation. All examinations are from the OCR syllabi.

Classical Civilisation

The course consists of two modules. During Form IV, Learners study key components from the ancient Greek and Roman religions including their gods and cult heroes and how they are depicted in art and myth. In Form V, students study Homer’s Odyssey in English translation and put the poem into its cultural context by studying the archaeological perspective and cultural legacy of the author.

Classical Greek

The Greek course is much like the Latin and is offered only to those studying Latin with much shared grammar. One of the key differences is the different alphabet but learners will acclimatise quickly and reading the words will become second nature. In Form V, students are able to study timeless authors such as Homer, Herodotus and Euripides, all in the original Greek.

Latin

Latin consists of an accelerated learning of the language from Form III including complicated clauses and Latin idioms; there is also an English to Latin component. In Form V, students are able to study some of the most important texts of Western civilisation from authors such as Cicero, Tacitus and Virgil, all in their original form.

The Classics department benefits from a variety of exploration outside of the classroom. We have recently been to Oxford to see a production of Euripides’ Bacchae in the original Greek and often visit plays in translation too. We often run trips to Bath to see how the Romans influenced our own country’s culture. We also plan excursions to Rome or Greece to look first hand at the monuments studied in our courses and to discover the inspirations of our authors and where their subjects became famous.

COMPUTER SCIENCE (IGCSE ICT)

“Technology is not a boy’s game, it’s not a girl’s game. It’s everyone’s game. It’s about where we are and where we’re going” 
Nichelle Nicols, former NASA Ambassador & Lt Uhura from Star Trek

In a constantly changing world, students need to have the skills and knowledge to not only gather, process and manipulate data, but also the ability to adapt to the shifting technology needs of the future. The IT Industry has been calling for more young people in the UK to be taught essential computational skills to prepare them for the technology industries of the future. In companies like Google, Microsoft and Apple, having a secure understanding of Computer Science can give you the edge, even if you have a less technical role such as Marketing or PR.

iGCSE ICT combines theoretical and practical study with a focus on the ability to use common software applications to solve problems, including spreadsheets, databases, interactive presentation software, web browsers and website design.

In addition to developing effective research skills as students practise finding reliable information from a variety of sources, they will analyse, design, implement, test and evaluate ICT systems, ensuring that they are fit for purpose. There will be opportunities to develop their team working skills as they work collaboratively, alongside an emphasis on independent learning. Time management will also be a key skill they will exercise to ensure they meet their deadlines.

The iGCSE ICT course has two main components assessed by external examination: 90 minute theory paper (50%) and a 3 hour online practical examination (50%).

Students will also develop key skills in the practical use of business and professional software packages; core transferable skills across disciplines and industries. There is an iGCE A Level in this subject which allows for progression.

DRAMA

“The stage is not merely the meeting place of all the arts, but is also the return of art to life”
Oscar Wilde

Drama is an art, a practical activity and an intellectual discipline. It involves the creation of imagined characters in a designated space. “A drama education which begins with play may eventually include all the elements of theatre. Like all the arts, drama helps us to make sense of the world.” (Drama in Schools). All students should be able to enjoy and participate in drama.

At Heathfield, Drama aims to develop self-esteem, self-confidence and the capacity to express ideas, thoughts and feelings. Students are encouraged to think imaginatively, using a range of dramatic skills, including voice, facial expression, movement and gesture, to understand a range of techniques, strategies, forms and conventions used in drama.

The GCSE course is an exciting, inspiring and practical course which compliments the aims of Heathfield School in a number of ways. The specification promotes involvement in and enjoyment of drama, as both performers and/or designers, and encourages collaboration between students due to the presence of group practical work. The course supports students in becoming reflective young people who have high expectations and are ambitious in their work ethic.

There is also the opportunity to attend live theatre performances and develop skills as informed and thoughtful audience members. This extends to a wider experience of current affairs and encourages students to have invigorating discussions regarding subjects they feel passionately about, sometimes even creating work based around important factors in today’s society.

In a more academic sense, the specification gives learners the opportunities to participate in and interpret their own and other’s drama, working practically as performers or designers across Components 1 and 2. The expectation within performance level and application of technical skills is extremely high, and students are expected to work both collaboratively and professionally with each other and any adults involved in the technical elements of the course. This means they develop the confidence to lead and support in any group, again striving to achieve excellence whilst acquiring theoretical skills and experience.

The students’ experience of drama is not confined to the drama lesson. There are a number of events on the school calendar in which drama students will be asked to participate and perform, such as Open Days and productions. Scholars in the Upper School run a Drama Club for Key Stage 3 students, in addition to which, many drama students are involved in the Inter-House Drama Competition, either as a Sixth Form Director or as cast and crew members. Many students are also involved in the annual school productions, and lower school drama showcase, and the termly LAMDA/Music concerts.

The English Department take part in the Shakespeare Schools Festival with a cast of Lower School students, and there is also our annual production which alternates between a musical or a play run by the Drama and Music Departments.

GEOGRAPHY

“Geography is the subject which holds the key to our future”
Michael Palin

Our aim is to stimulate and encourage the girls to develop an understanding and awareness of geographical locations, concepts and skills, in an ever-changing world. ‘Think local, act global’ is a mind-set that promotes responsibility as a global citizen, making contributions to a sustainable and inclusive future.  Students are encouraged to understand their role in society by considering different viewpoints, values and attitudes.

The AQA course enables students to explore the world, the challenges it faces and their own place in it as well as to help prepare them to succeed in their future choices.

There are 3 units based on Living with the Physical Environment (the challenge of natural hazards, the living world and physical landscapes in the UK). Challenges in the Human Environment (urban issues, the changing economic world and resource management). Finally Geographical applications where each girl will undertake 2 days of fieldwork and prepare a write-up which will be examined in Paper 3. Embedded throughout the course are the essential mapwork and graphical skills.

Beyond the Classroom

An annual whole school Geography/Photography competition takes place with a broad theme for staff and students to explore, such as Home – 2020, A Sustainable Future (2019) and Change (2018)).  Students and staff are awarded prizes based on a variety of criteria.

Geography is dynamic and all around us and our ‘Geography in the News’ board plus the annotated whiteboard world map reflect ever-changing issues and impacts across the globe.

HISTORY

“History is the version of past events that people have decided to agree upon”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Our main objective is to generate a life-long interest in and enjoyment of history and to develop each student’s critical understanding of past and contemporary societies.

At GCSE the department follows the Edexcel International GCSE which is comprised of four units which are externally examined in two papers:

Unit 1: A World Divided: Superpower Relations, 1943-1972

This unit deals with the international situation after World War II and in particular the rivalry between the emergent Superpowers the USA and the Communist USSR. It includes a study of the Cuban Missile Crisis and the erection of the Berlin Wall, events that brought the World to the brink of thermonuclear conflict and World War III.

Unit 2: A Divided Union: Civil Rights in the USA, 1945-74

This unit focuses on the period of hysteria and protest in the USA brought about by the Cold War, Vietnam War and black civil rights.

Unit 3: Russia and the Soviet Union, 1905-24

Students will study the upheaval in Russia during this period which started with an attempted revolution in 1905 and culminated in a full revolution in 1917.

Unit 4: China: Conflict, Crisis and Change, c1900-c1989

Students will learn about a period of great change in Chinese History dominated by revolution, civil war and dictatorship. The focus will largely be on the impact of Chairman Mao and his successors’ reforms on the Chinese people.

LATIN

“I am not an Athenian or a Greek but a citizen of the World”
Socrates

The subject Classics is defined at Heathfield School as the study of Latin, Greek and Classical Civilisation. The relevance and purpose of Classics in particular Latin and Greek has been questioned in recent times but in the words of Professor Peter Jones of the University of Newcastle: “if Latin and Greek are dead languages, then Mozart is dead music, and Shakespeare is dead poetry.” The knowledge and skills acquired through the study of Classics will be similar to other subjects. What makes Classics distinctive is its focus on the Greek and Roman time periods that is from the Minoan civilisations of Crete to the fall of the Roman Empire in the third century AD.

Students benefit much from the study of the West’s earliest literate cultures. The exploration of the Greek and Roman civilisations gives the 21st century student much to ponder on in respect to her own worldview and the society in which she belongs.

For GCSE, the Classics department offers three option subjects of Latin, Classical Greek and Classical Civilisation. All examinations are from the OCR syllabi.

Latin

Latin consists of an accelerated learning of the language from Form III including complicated clauses and Latin idioms; there is also an English to Latin component. In Form V, students are able to study some of the most important texts of Western civilisation from authors such as Cicero, Tacitus and Virgil, all in their original form.

The Classics department benefits from a variety of exploration outside of the classroom. We have recently been to Oxford to see a production of Euripides’ Bacchae in the original Greek and often visit plays in translation too. We often run trips to Bath to see how the Romans influenced our own country’s culture. We also plan excursions to Rome or Greece to look first hand at the monuments studied in our courses and to discover the inspirations of our authors and where their subjects became famous.

MUSIC

“Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music”
Rachmaninov

Music enables young people to define themselves in relation to others, their friends, social groups and to the culture in which they live. It is an integral part of culture, past and present. Music stimulates the acquisition of the skills, attitudes and attributes needed for life such as listening skills, concentration, aural memory, presentation and teamwork. It also develops creativity, risk-taking, intuition, sensitivity, perseverance and a sense of achievement and enjoyment.

The Edexcel GCSE in Music comprises three units:

  • Performing Music
    One solo and one ensemble performance with a minimum of 5 hours of recording time available.
  • Composition
    Two coursework compositions are completed during the course.
    One must be based on one of the four Areas of Study and one can be their own choice.
  • Listening
    The exam is 105 minutes in length and consists of 9 questions. They listen to the musical extracts – 7 out of the 8 set works, plus one unfamiliar extract and one extended essay.

A wide range of resources are available, including their own PCs running Sibelius 8 for composition. Students will be encouraged to actively participate in groups such as Orchestra, Choir, Chamber Ensembles and student formed groups, performing in school concerts and culminating in a biennial European Tour. An annual trip is also arranged to an Orchestral Concert.

Music is an excellent preparation for A Level Courses in Performing, Composing, Historical and Analytical Studies. Music graduates may become Teachers, Arts Administrators, Music Publishers, Performers, Music Therapists, Instrument Repairers, Music Journalists, Radio or Television Producers, Army Musicians or Sound Engineers, amongst many other career options.

Extra-Curricular Music at Heathfield includes:

  • Senior Choir (Forms III – UVI)
  • Form I Choir
  • Form II Choir
  • Top 12 Choir
  • Orchestra
  • Band
  • Woodwind and String Ensemble
  • A Cappella group, which is student-led

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

“Sport marks out those who strive: it rewards inequality of both talent and application”
Kevin Myers, ‘The Irish Independent’

Students will improve their knowledge and performance in a range of practical activities and will have a chance to learn about the principles and practices which lead to good performance. The course will help develop their confidence, self-esteem and sense of team spirit.

The specification has 3 Units:

  • Physical Factors Affecting Performance: Anatomy & Physiology
    Socio-Cultural Issues & Sports Psychology
    Practical Performance

There are two written papers and a practical performance examination.

PHOTOGRAPHY

“The person that cannot interpret a photograph will be the illiterate of the future”
Walter Benjamin

Our aim is to deliver a well-rounded education in Photography providing students with theoretical, contextual and practical knowledge with skills that they will be able to use for life. Students are offered many opportunities within the photographic field and the course comprises a wide range of taught skills that include contemporary digital practice, including advanced Photoshop techniques, to more traditional negative processing and darkroom development work.

In addition, students enjoy numerous gallery visits, an annual residential trip and an end of year Private View to showcase the amazing work produced.

Our goal is to encourage students to progress their own ideas and follow independent learning objectives with individual guidance to ensure that complete understanding is evident and interesting portfolio images are created. A wide range of career opportunities and university places could then be considered in areas such as fashion, advertising, documentary or contemporary photographic practice. Our intention is to provide students with the skills to pursue professions in film, TV, as lighting technicians, stylists, cinematographers… the list is endless!

Many students choose to study Photography at university and have gained places at Parsons New York, Manchester School of Art and LCC, London to name but a few.

The Good Schools Guide have awarded the Heathfield Photography Department the ‘Best Photography at an Independent School’ award since 2009 based on the consistently high results achieved by the students.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

The GCSE course is both academically rigorous and intellectually challenging. Studying RS will help students develop their thinking skills and understand the world around them. The topics and religions chosen will equip students to lead constructive lives in the modern world as well as to adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religious beliefs and practices. The knowledge, understanding and skills gained as a result of studying GCSE Religious Studies are useful for a wide range of A Level subjects and further academic studies.

There are three parts of the course:

  • Christian beliefs and teachings and Christian practices
    Muslim beliefs and teachings and Muslim practices
    Philosophical and Ethical themes

The course is assessed through three external exams at the end of Form V. Examination questions consists of shorter knowledge based questions and longer evaluation essays. Religious Studies is a thriving subject both nationally and at Heathfield. Many students choose to continue on to A Level Religious Studies in the Sixth Form; some go on to select philosophical and theological courses at top universities including Oxford, Durham, Edinburgh and King’s College, London.

Different events and trips will support classroom learning. Earlier this year there was a trip to Córdoba in Spain which related to both the Christianity and Islam parts of the course.

SPANISH

“A different language is a different vision of life”
Frederico Fellini

Given Britain’s position in Europe and the increasing need to communicate with our continental neighbours as well as with international existing and potential partners, we highly value the study of modern languages at Heathfield. An ability to speak English as well as French or Spanish is an advantage on the international job scene. Language teachers at Heathfield School are native speakers. The presence of a French and Spanish speaking assistant is another important feature of the department. They provide an added view of their country and allow more creative activities to take place both in and outside the classroom.

All students take their GCSE examinations in Form V although fluent or near-fluent speakers and exceptional linguists can sit their GCSE at the end of Form IV. It is not possible to enter an MFL GCSE course as a complete beginner.

The GCSE specification allows pupils to develop the ability to use their chosen language not only to communicate but also for intellectual stimulation and enjoyment. The course aims to broaden pupils’ understanding of the culture of the countries of the languages they are studying. The four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening will be explored and developed across a wide range of topic areas.

In addition to French and Spanish, we can also provide tuition in other languages including Arabic, Chinese, Italian, Japanese, German, Modern Greek, Portuguese and Russian.

The MFL department runs weekly after school Enrichment Clubs for both French and Spanish students where they improve the level of their language skills through written exercises, taking part in lively discussions and activities that improve grammar and increase vocabulary. The department also runs a reading club for advanced linguists and holds international movie nights every week to enable students to practise their listening skills as well as providing an opportunity to encounter and discuss experiences, emotions and cultural differences.

Spanish Trip to Córdoba in Andalucía

An exciting trip to Córdoba in Spain is organised for GCSE and A Level students every other year. The students have the opportunity to improve their comprehension skills and are encouraged to actively use their Spanish in everyday situations. They enjoy recording each other communicating in Spanish with the local community.

The trip includes fascinating visits to the incredible Mezquita, The Medina Azahara ruins, the Reyes Catolicos Palace and students also engage in the popular and dramatic processions of the Semana Santa festival.

Non Exam Courses

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Girls in Form IV have three double periods a week. As well as the traditional sports they will have already covered, they now have a chance to experience 5 week blocks of the following sports: Badminton; Basketball; Fitness; Football; Hockey; Rugby. This will help them to prepare to make more informed decisions about the sports they choose in Form V and the Sixth Form.

Girls in Form V have two double periods a week and may choose from the following sports: Aerobics; Athletics; Badminton; Basketball; Fitness; Golf; Football; Hockey; Lacrosse; Netball; Rounders; Swimming; Tennis and Zumba.

The aim of these sessions is for girls to experience a variety of sports and to find one they feel confident to pursue when they have left school.

PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION (PHSE)

PSHE is taught in Forms I-UVI in one lesson per week. Lessons are enhanced by presentations from outside speakers and agencies.

The aim of the course is to help students to:

  • Lead confident, healthy and responsible lives as individuals and as members of society
  • Gain practical knowledge and skills to help them live healthily and deal with the spiritual, moral, social, cultural and financial issues they face as they approach adulthood
  • Reflect on their experiences and try to understand and manage responsibly a range of relationships, showing respect for others
  • Believe in their ability to succeed and take responsibility for their learning and future choices
  • Demonstrate personal and group responsibility in their attitudes to themselves and others
  • Obtain and use different kinds of information, including the media, to form and express an opinion